When Is Cefpodoxime for Dogs Prescribed

When Is Cefpodoxime for Dogs Prescribed

Author WDF Staff

02.09.2021.


Dogs can get bacterial infections, and when that happens, you have to visit your vet and ask for their intervention. Some bacterial infections are worse than others, so it is excellent news that different antibiotics, like cefpodoxime, are available. If your vet prescribes this antibiotic to your dog, it is natural that you want to learn more about it. Here’s what you should know about cefpodoxime for dogs.

What is cefpodoxime?

Cefpodoxime is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic that is commonly used to treat skin infections in dogs. It is often prescribed off-label to cats and dogs with UTI. Off-label prescription is nothing new in veterinary medicine, and you shouldn’t be too surprised if that happens. Cefpodoxime is the active ingredient in drugs called Simplicef® and Vantin®, and it is effective against these bacteria;

  • Pasteurella
  • Staphylococcus
  • Streptococcus canis
  • E. coli

You can order cefpodoxime generic tablets on Chewy.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Only licensed vets can prescribe antibiotics, and if you are not a licensed veterinarian, you shouldn’t medicate your dog. Never give medications to your dog without consulting a vet.

Is it effective?

When dog owners have to give their dogs any kind of medication, they usually ask this question, “Is it effective?” Naturally, they want to know how fast will it take for the drug to take effect. This antibiotic will start taking effect 2 hours after the initial dose, but clinical improvements should show in a day or two.

Cephalosporin antibiotics were initially developed to deal with super-bacteria, which means they are actually more effective than other antibiotics like penicillin or cephalexin. Bacteria have a natural response to antibiotics, and they will try to dissolve them by releasing enzymes. However, cephalosporin-based antibiotics are very resistant to those enzymes, which makes them super effective.

Is cefpodoxime safe?

The second question dog owners want to know is, “Is cefpodoxime safe for my dog?” Keep in mind that all antibiotics can cause adverse reactions in dogs, and that is something you should be prepared for. However, if you follow your vet’s instructions and you stick to the recommended schedule, there is no reason you should expect your dog to react badly to this antibiotic.

older dog in dog house

Cefpodoxime side effects

All medications can cause side effects, and cefpodoxime is no different. This antibiotic is considered safe, but you should know what might happen if your dog reacts badly. The most common cefpodoxime side effects are;

Overdosing on cefpodoxime

Overdoses on cefpodoxime are not common, but you should call your vet for an emergency interaction and treatment if they happen. If you stick to the administration schedule, your dog should be completely fine. However, we all know dogs tend to get into trouble, and they might get into your medicine drawer and eat tablets. In that case, take them to the closest animal ER.

puppy on the floor

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Dogs can be allergic to antibiotics, so if your dog has an allergic reaction, you should stop giving it to your dog immediately. Make sure you mention to your vet if your dog had allergic reactions to antibiotics.

How is cefpodoxime given to dogs?

If your dog has to take cefpodoxime, make sure you follow your vet’s instructions on how to give this drug to your dog. Your vet knows your dog’s medical history and current state of the infection, so they might adapt the dosage and administration. Generally, this antibiotic is given once every 24 hours. That makes it really convenient and easy to administer.

This medication is available as a tablet or an oral suspension. We prefer giving tablets to our dogs because they are easier to measure. Oral suspensions can be tricky if you don’t know what you are doing. Plus, you can never be sure how much your dog spat out.

What if I miss a dose?

If you missed giving a dose to your dog, just give them as soon as you remember. However, if it is close to the time your dog should take their usual dose, just skip the one you missed and give it at the time they should take their regular dose. If you changed the schedule, just adapt the new schedule. For example, if you usually give the medication at 3 PM, and you missed a dose, simply make a new schedule and provide the medication to your dog at the new time.

World Dog Finder team

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